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BM23 capillary line restriction?

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  • BM23 capillary line restriction?

    Unit stopped cooling so well so I evacuated it and attempted to refill the system. Long story short, it won't provide a bit of cooling without adding 2x-4x the required amount (~10oz vs. 3.75oz). In fact the low side remains in a vacuum state until about 6 oz. Once I get the low side up to ~12-15 psi and get good cooling, the high side is ~350 psi which I know is too high. With it in this state it cools fantabulousely, but it runs way too long which ends up over cooling. If I pop the top and look at the capillary line going into the evap coils, they form a sort of pig tail/corkscrew before going into the evap. About 1/3 the way through the pig tail, the icing starts. Is it safe to assume that the restriction is right there where the icing starts? Is the length of capillary line so important to the system that I couldn't snip it there and stretch that up to the evap coil? What tips can you provide me for sweat fitting a new line into the evap coil? Heat it and pull the old out, extend the new line past the connection to the evap and sweat fit it back like a plumbing line? If I buy a new drier, would it come attached to a new cap line and high side fitting or do all parts come separate?

  • #2
    Originally posted by bard View Post
    Unit stopped cooling so well so I evacuated it and attempted to refill the system. Long story short, it won't provide a bit of cooling without adding 2x-4x the required amount (~10oz vs. 3.75oz). In fact the low side remains in a vacuum state until about 6 oz. Once I get the low side up to ~12-15 psi and get good cooling, the high side is ~350 psi which I know is too high. With it in this state it cools fantabulousely, but it runs way too long which ends up over cooling. If I pop the top and look at the capillary line going into the evap coils, they form a sort of pig tail/corkscrew before going into the evap. About 1/3 the way through the pig tail, the icing starts. Is it safe to assume that the restriction is right there where the icing starts? Is the length of capillary line so important to the system that I couldn't snip it there and stretch that up to the evap coil? What tips can you provide me for sweat fitting a new line into the evap coil? Heat it and pull the old out, extend the new line past the connection to the evap and sweat fit it back like a plumbing line? If I buy a new drier, would it come attached to a new cap line and high side fitting or do all parts come separate?
    It sounds like you are correct in that you have a restriction. Yes, the cap tube length is fairly critical. That is what meters the refrigerant though the system at the proper rate. Much like the proper size beer line & length will control the flow of beer at the tap.

    You can try cutting just an inch or two before the icing starts & about six or so inches after & splice together with a two or three inch length of 1/4 in tubing being careful not to weld the cap tube closed. I have found a pair of wire strippers works well to cut the cap tube without pinching the ends shut. If you are lucky you will have cut out the section with the restriction. If it continues to ice up you will need to replace the drier & entire cap tube.

    You will need to get a hold of Bev Air or one of their parts suppliers to obtain a new cap tube & drier. And the cap tube & drier generally come separate. As far as sweating out the old & in with the new cap tube, an oxy/acetylene torch is best because it focuses the heat where you need it better. You can heat the end of the evaporator & slide out the old cap tube & most of the time a new one will slide back in.


    THE ICEMAN
    My conversion ===------->> KILLER KEGERATOR
    "Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza."
    -Dave Barry-
    "We old folks have to find our cushions and pillows in our tankards.
    Strong beer is the milk of the old."
    -Martin Luther-

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